Monday, September 18, 2017

When Extra Supervision is Needed for Preteens/ Teens with Pets.

When it comes to mixing adolescent and teenage kids with pets you can either get a good mix of love, kindness and respect or you get a near apocalyptic catastrophe. As an Animal Communicator and even in my experience in general, I’ve seen teenagers approach and view their family pets with respect and I’ve also seen kids be nasty to animals as well. One day at a day camp I was attending, it was in the morning before line up and one of the boys had a bag of Twizzlers. They were hanging around the pony pasture and one decided to stick one of the Twizzlers up the ponies nose. The pony didn’t appreciate it and they took it out. Had a supervising adult been around, I’m sure they would not have done that. They thought it was funny – it was anything but.

I’ve also heard from one of my clients that she’s had a friend over with a couple of her kids (a girl and a boy). The girl listened to my client and was gentle with her dog (a toy breed). When the boy tried to pet my clients dog, the dog (who is a rescue) snapped in the air as a warning to the child. The boy thought the dog bit him and proceeded to periodically swing at the dog during their visit. My client told the boy repeatedly to stop swinging at her dog and that no - the dog didn’t actually bite him. But the child didn’t listen.

This begs the question then – who is responsible for the actions of a child when they are in someone else’s house? There’s the old adage of “My house, my rules” and therefore the pet owner could have said something more to the child. There’s also the statement of not disciplining other people’s children. If the mother barely has any control over her children in her own house and this child in particular has a habit of swinging at the pets in the house, what then?

Granted, the above is a more extreme case that would require a lot of deep discussion and thought.

The general thing that needs to happen is the teens/preteens need and must respect a pet’s space and agency. If they don’t – that’s how bites happen and that’s how people and animals get hurt. At best – the kids will listen to their parents when they tell them not to chase or poke at a dog or cat. At worst – the pet owner will send their pets to a pet hotel or day camp for the day or night.

As a pet owner, if you know for a fact that your pet either does not get along well with kids or has a problem with a small crowd – boarding them or having them stay with someone can be an option.

All of this to say, my dear readers – what can you do to supervise your teens or preteens around pets? If you’re the pet owner who dreads having someone’s kids over because they terrorize your pets – could you talk to the parent and open up a dialogue? For the overwhelmed parent that has a child that won’t take that “no” for an answer – is there additional help you can get? The greater challenge here is to get a conversation going so we don’t wind up with a crippling phobia of kids for pets and vice versa.

Are you up for that challenge?

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